Browse Tag

languedoc

Two asses

[label]Terrier “Domaine des 2 Ânes” 2005 Corbières Fontanilles (Languedoc) – Sweaty, leathery, and a little bretty, with that barnyardy-metallic fog somewhat obscuring twisted fruit that seems like it should be darker than it is; this very deception is a signature of this appellation, at least for me. Gnarly, and not in a Jeff Spicoli sort of way. I’d like to see it cleaned up a bit, but if one can get past that the elements are quite appealing. (9/08)

Mon Dieuvaille

[label]Miquel “Domaine de Barroubio” 2004 Muscat St-Jean-de-Minervois Dieuvaille (Languedoc) – A single-parcel muscat (or so I’m led to believe) named after an historic church near the village. Intense essence of muscat, with life and plenty of nerve. Very intense, and while it’s heavy it’s got the structure to support itself. Terrific. (10/06)

Sec & thoughts

Miquel “Domaine de Barroubio” 2005 Muscat Sec (Languedoc) – Fresh-cut hay, but the mower caught a more than a few flowers as well. Clean, crisp, and long. Nice. Though Alsace remains my benchmark for dry muscat, there’s a sun to (or in) this wine that’s really appealing. (10/06)

Am I Bleue?

[label]Miquel “Domaine de Barroubio” 2004 Muscat St-Jean-de-Minervois “Cuvée Classique” (Languedoc) – This is thee basic wine, also known as “Cuvée Noire” in some markets. Clover honey drizzled over gingered grapes. Long and floral, though with a certain lightness that freshens the sugar. (10/06)

Miquel “Domaine de Barroubio” 2005 Muscat St-Jean-de-Minervois “Cuvée Classique” (Languedoc) – Richer and more vivid than the 2004, though there’s a spikiness to the structure than reduces the appealing cream of the previous vintage. Grapes and green apples add themselves to the finish, which is surprisingly tangy. This is clearly a better wine than the 2004, though it may take a little while to settle into itself. (10/06)

Barroubio 2004 Muscat St-Jean-de-Minervois “Cuvée Bleue” (Languedoc) – Aged in wood (one presumes old) for nine months, on its lees. Chewy/creamy pine needles. Strong, heavy, and somewhat hot. Too much. (10/06)

John, Mike, Marie, Tess

[label]Miquel “Domaine de Barroubio” 2002 Minervois “Cuvée Jean-Miquel” (Languedoc) – Carignan-dominated, with grenache playing the supporting role. Grapey and thick, with a rough texture and a slightly green finish. There’s not much form or cohesion here, nor are the elements particularly appealing. (10/06)

Miquel “Domaine de Barroubio” 2003 Minervois “Cuvée Marie-Thérèse” (Languedoc) – Here, syrah is king, with some grenache along for the ride. Denser than the Jean-Miquel, with a thick earthiness that feels almost sludgy. The fruit has a nutty character that’s a little odd, but ultimately intriguing. That said, it’s not very interesting now, though a short stretch of time might help. (10/06)

Helvetica

[picpoul]Font-Mars 2007 Languedoc Picpoul de Pinet (Languedoc) – Mixed grasses, greenery, and grapefruit pith with the rough scrape of a dull razor. Very amenable to chilling, and eminently drinkable. This is an excellent bargain picpoul, though there are versions with a little more class. (7/08)

Albert Poujol

[winery house]Poujol 2006 Vin de Pays de l’Hérault Rosé (Languedoc) – Heavy (due to alcohol; I feel like I’ve made this criticism about so many southern French rosés, even I’m getting tired of hearing myself say it), with slightly lurid strawberry…but the flowers rather than the fruit, and a finish more like strawberry Kool-Aid than I’d like. What happened here? This used to be more identifiable as wine. (5/08)

Burn the heretics!

Iché 2005 Vin de Pays de l’Hérault “Les Hérétiques” (Languedoc) – Solid, dark fruit residue with a hint of meat and wild thyme. It’s tempting to call this wine pro-forma, but that’s only due to familiarity; this remains, even given the terrible dollar/euro exchange, a very good value that plays well with wines twice its price. But…alas, the recent passing of its maker leaves this (along with the rest of the Oupia line) in doubt. (5/08)

They’re here

They “Château Vieux Moulin” 2000 Corbières “Les Ailes” (Languedoc) – Softened a bit by modern winemaking, but with an unquenchable foundation of rustic dark berries, meat soda, and rough minerality. Good, but I think it could be better with a little less futzing in the cellar. (10/06)